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COMP 560-Ethics and the Law in the Digital Age - Myler (UNH Manchester): Writing Abstracts and Annotated Bibliographies

Abstract Writing Tips

   "An abstract is a self-contained, short, and powerful statement that describes a larger work. Components vary according to discipline; an abstract of a social science or scientific work may contain the scope, purpose, results, and contents of the work. An abstract of a humanities work may contain the thesis, background, and conclusion of the larger work. An abstract is not a review, nor does it evaluate the work being abstracted. While it contains key words found in the larger work, the abstract is an original document rather than an excerpted passage."  - The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Annotated Bibliography Tips

"An annotated bibliography is a list of citations to books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief (usually about 150 words) descriptive and evaluative paragraph, the annotation. The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources cited." - Reference Department, Olin and Uris Libraries, Cornell University.