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ADMN 444

Online Resources

PLACES FOR INSPIRATION

If you need some sources of inspiration for identifying an appropriate company, here are some useful places to look:

Shared Value Initiative: https://www.sharedvalue.org/ In particular look under the Resources Tab to see great examples of Shared Value by industry or issue area

CSR Wire: http://www.csrwire.com/  Excellent website with tons of great information.  Includes the Sustainability Reports for many major companies.

GreenBiz: http://www.greenbiz.com/ Another great general resource.

Triple Pundit: http://www.triplepundit.com Another great general resource.

Report Alert: http://reportalert.info/ Latest company sustainability reports (and repository of older reports)

Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship: https://ccc.bc.edu/content/ccc/research.html

B Corporations:  https://bcorporation.net/   B Lab certifies companies which meet a minimum score across a range of categories related to social and environmental performance. You can search by company name, location, sector or industry.

CDP Global A List:  https://www.cdp.net/en/scores-2017

Corporate Knights Global 100: http://www.global100.org/  The Global 100 is the most extensive data-driven corporate sustainability assessment in existence, and inclusion is limited to a select group of the top 100 large-cap companies in the world. Launched in 2005, the annual Global 100 is announced each year during the World Economic Forum in Davos.

Fortune Change the World List http://fortune.com/change-the-world/

Dow Jones Sustainability Index: http://www.sustainability-indices.com/

Newsweek Green Ranking: https://www.newsweek.com/green-rankings-2017-18

Reputation Institute: The Global RepTrak® 100 study measures 100 of the most highly regarded companies across 15 countries. It identifies what it takes to have a strong global reputation, and how leading companies are perceived. https://www.reputationinstitute.com/global-reptrak-100

Some other sources, which are focused more on “social entrepreneurs” – these are often smaller organizations, which have a more explicit social mission but use market mechanisms (as opposed to traditional non-profit approaches) to address their social mission. (Note: If you use these lists, be sure to look for social entrepreneurs who are using market-based approaches (as opposed to philanthropic approaches) to solving social issues.)

Ashoka Innovators for the Public Good: https://www.ashoka.org/fellows List of leading social entrepreneurs who have been recognized for their innovative solutions to social problems and the potential to change patterns across society. Ashoka Fellows work in over 70 countries around the globe in every area of human need.

Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship: http://www.schwabfound.org/entrepreneurs

Skoll Foundation: http://www.skollfoundation.org/skoll-entrepreneurs/