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Information Literacy @ UNH

Research Skills Instruction

UNH librarians work with faculty and students to make them more savvy researchers and information users. We can help build research into assignments (see the Assignment Design tab), or collaborate on one-time or semester-long bases.

Research Instruction Classes

To schedule a research instruction class, please use our Library Instruction Request form. For more information, please visit on "For Faculty" under the "Community" tab on the library's home page.

Research instruction classes are most useful when tied to a specific assignment, and timed to reach students when they would normally need to begin their research (which may be later than you think).

Librarians will work with you to customize the class to your students' knowledge, skills, and research topics.

Classes can include:

  • Topic exploration: identifying and focusing topics, concept mapping, teaching research as an exploratory and iterative process
  • Search strategies: how to turn a research question into keywords; how to narrow or broaden searches; how to use subject headings and other controlled vocabulary
  • Source evaluation: differentiating among scholarly, popular, and trade publications; verifying information's accuracy and authority; identifying what types of information may be found in particular sources (e.g., journal articles, blogs, videos) and how to use it
  • Discipline-specific research strategies
  • How and why of information citation practices
  • Discussions around
    • scholarly and community authority
    • the cost and value of information
    • the markers of different information formats
    • fake news and misinformation
    • scholarly publication practices
    • data management
    • how information is organized, stored, and retrieved
    • ethical uses of information
    • critical information literacy and social justice
    • and a variety of other general or discipline-specific topics.

Other Collaborations

If you are interested in library and information literacy skills being more embedded in your course, please contact either Kathrine Aydelott, Information Literacy Librarian, or your subject librarian. Possibilities include:

  • Building on concepts in multiple, shorter sessions
  • Building information resources and skills into assignments
  • Creating a specialized research guide for students
  • Consultations with faculty, students, or student groups
  • Anything else you can think of!